Design
front of Scusi Trattoria
by Crème Design
by Crème Design
by Crème Design
Walk into Scusi, and you might think you’ve slipped into a beach town café given its trademark seaside blue tones, whitewashed woods, and striped fabrics that pop with color. That is exactly how Chef Laurent Tourondel wants you to feel. He did his research, visiting a number of places in seaside areas around Italy to set the atmosphere for Scusi. Crème Design artfully translated his vision into the space you see today.
the design details title in white and blue
Open kitchen
“The counter is a beautiful white marble. The dye wall comprises large, rectangular terracotta tiles, so prevalent in Italian architecture, which bring that Italian streetscape into the coastal feel.”
Banquettes and tables
“There is a lot of variety between the tables, chairs, and pillows presented in the main dining room. Likewise with the banquettes. One has that outdoor, beachy park bench feel to it, while the others are more of a trattoria sofa.”
Outdoor canopy
“The canopy over the outside portion of the bar is made from pickled cypress, an Italian craftsman’s wood. It is covered in bamboo for a coastal, Mediterranean look.”
Yellow pendant lighting over bar
“The indoor pendant lights above the bar are powder coated in a glossy, bright yellow as a wink to Italian Fiats you might see zipping along the coast and the Italian automotive culture in general.”
Ovens
“The wood-burning ovens, covered in blue glazed tiles from floor to ceiling, are the heart and hearth of Scusi. It’s no accident that they are the first thing you see when you enter the space, because pizza is the highlight here, and they tie in the family gathering together at a table to share a pie.”
bar and chairs in a restaurant
the design details title in white and blue
Banquettes and tables at restaurant
Banquettes and tables
“There is a lot of variety between the tables, chairs, and pillows presented in the main dining room. Likewise with the banquettes. One has that outdoor, beachy park bench feel to it, while the others are more of a trattoria sofa.”
Open kitchen at restaurant
Open kitchen
“The counter is a beautiful white marble. The dye wall comprises large, rectangular terracotta tiles, so prevalent in Italian architecture, which bring that Italian streetscape into the coastal feel.”
Outdoor canopy at restaurant
Outdoor canopy
“The canopy over the outside portion of the bar is made from pickled cypress, an Italian craftsman’s wood. It is covered in bamboo for a coastal, Mediterranean look.”
ovens at restaurant
Ovens
“The wood-burning ovens, covered in blue glazed tiles from floor to ceiling, are the heart and hearth of Scusi. It’s no accident that they are the first thing you see when you enter the space, because pizza is the highlight here, and they tie in the family gathering together at a table to share a pie.”
Yellow pendant lighting over bar at restaurant
Yellow pendant lighting over bar
“The indoor pendant lights above the bar are powder coated in a glossy, bright yellow as a wink to Italian Fiats you might see zipping along the coast and the Italian automotive culture in general.”
Greg Evans at Creme Design

G
reg Evans, design project manager at Crème Design, worked hand in hand with Chef Tourondel to realize the overarching design elements and details. While Evans likens L’Amico to an urban, rustic Italian kitchen, he compares Scusi’s look and feel to an Italian seaside landscape: light and breezy, like sitting by the waters in Capri at an outside café. Regardless of the scene set, each place is rooted in authenticity. “All of Laurent Tourondel’s projects are based in honesty and truth,” explains Evans. “Whether it takes the form of types of beautiful wood, tile, or lighting, the idea is not to recreate a vibe that’s cartoonish, but to replicate by grasping true characteristics.” That is best represented by the enormous open kitchen and its twin wood-burning stoves, where, Evans says, “the cooking is revealed directly to the customer.”

At just more than 5,000 square feet, Scusi is a big space. And although the intention was to open it up, Tourondel was also inspired by old homes converted into restaurants that suggest you’re eating at your mother’s house or at one of her friend’s. While the kitchen is open, and a large dining room space greets you up front, there are pockets that keep it real and cozy at the same time, not to mention details that pull in warmth. Evans points out shelving, a selection of mirrors, framed photos everywhere, and wine bottles, slightly out of place. “It’s not supposed to be orderly and perfect. Someone is hosting a party at their house, and you are their guest.”

There is whitewashed wood and bricks, terracotta tiles, yards of blue-and-white striped fabrics, and concrete. Upholstered banquettes break up seating areas, inspired by park benches and sofas you’d find in a trattoria. Some tables are round, others square. The chairs that gather around them are often not all the same style. The ceiling heights and materials vary. A bar ties together the indoor and outdoor spaces, almost like a racetrack, and tables covered by large umbrellas feel over-the-top Mediterranean in the best way possible.

Throughout it all, Evans says Tourondel was both receptive and directive. “He is remarkably insightful on knowing what he’s seen, what he wants, and how he wants something to feel. He will twist something on its head if necessary, or redirect as needed in pursuit of that truth he is trying to convey.”

Offering a menu that will delight Tourondel fans, the space was obviously informed by the type of food that would be served, as well as Tourondel’s brand of hospitality. “It goes back to representing that authenticity of ingredients, a commitment to quality cooking, and the value he places on the way he serves his guests.”