scusi pasta
A Primer on Pasta from the Amalfi Coast
Dreaming of an Italian vacation on the water? The Amalfi Coast is lined with postcard-pretty towns, Positano among the best known. Almost smack dab in the middle of this stretch of stunning coastline is Minori, famous for its underground ruins at the Villa Romana and handmade pasta.
During Italy’s Bourbon Era (1734–1861), Minori was the center of handmade pasta production for the Kingdom of Naples and the foundation for the economy of the Amalfi Coast. Many mills and factories were built along the Reghinna Minor River that flows through this creviced valley. Ribbons of pasta were hung to dry on washing lines in sunny piazzas. It wasn’t until the 18th century that the modern pasta industry was moved to Gragnano.

The pasta shapes formed in that tiny town dot the plates at Scusi Trattoria, perfectly crafted creations often made entirely from flour and water. Because a dish always tastes that much better with a story behind it, here’s a few to whet your appetite and earn you history cred in the process. After all, Italian DNA is shaped by pasta!

Mafaldine
Also known as mafalda or reginette (Italian for little queens), these are long, wide, flat pasta ribbons with scalloped or ruffled edges. They are made from durum wheat and water.

The pasta’s claim to fame is that it was created for a beautiful princess called Mafalda of Savoy, the second daughter of King Victor Emmanuel III of Italy who had beautiful, curly blonde locks. Her story ends sadly with marriage to a German prince, Philipp of Hesse, who became a Nazi. Adolf Hitler hated the princess and sent her to her death in a concentration camp.

Ricci
Ricci means curls, an appropriate name for these pasta ringlets made from semolina flour and tepid water! Rumor is that ladies in Minori use the metal spokes from an old umbrella to make the ricci twist. You could sub in a pointed knitting needle if you don’t have an umbrella handy, or try a wooden BBQ skewer.
Mafaldine pasta
Scialatielli pasta
Ricci pasta
’Ndunderi pasta
Scialatielli
Scialatielli is a fresh pasta that’s typical of the Amalfi region. Its name comes from two words of Neapolitan dialect origin: scialare (to enjoy) and tiella (pan). While the pasta resembles tagliatelle, the dough is made with milk, rather than eggs. Famously served with seafood in the region, it is said to have been created in the 1960s by local celebrity Chef Enrico Cosentino.
’Ndunderi
’Ndunderi di Minori is considered the longest-lived gnocchi. In fact, it is recognized and protected by UNESCO as among the first forms of pasta made in Italy. This humble dumpling is a modern-day variation of an ancient Roman dish called farina caserta, which literally translates to wheyed flour. Today, it is made with flour and ricotta. ’Ndunderi di Minori is a traditional dish of the Amalfi Coast that is widely eaten during the celebrations of Santa Trofimena, patron saint of the city of Minori, and Gusta Minori held at the end of August to promote the gastronomy of the region.
Mafaldine pasta
Mafaldine
Also known as mafalda or reginette (Italian for little queens), these are long, wide, flat pasta ribbons with scalloped or ruffled edges. They are made from durum wheat and water.

The pasta’s claim to fame is that it was created for a beautiful princess called Mafalda of Savoy, the second daughter of King Victor Emmanuel III of Italy who had beautiful, curly blonde locks. Her story ends sadly with marriage to a German prince, Philipp of Hesse, who became a Nazi. Adolf Hitler hated the princess and sent her to her death in a concentration camp.

Ricci pasta
Ricci
Ricci means curls, an appropriate name for these pasta ringlets made from semolina flour and tepid water! Rumor is that ladies in Minori use the metal spokes from an old umbrella to make the ricci twist. You could sub in a pointed knitting needle if you don’t have an umbrella handy, or try a wooden BBQ skewer.
Scialatielli pasta
Scialatielli
Scialatielli is a fresh pasta that’s typical of the Amalfi region. Its name comes from two words of Neapolitan dialect origin: scialare (to enjoy) and tiella (pan). While the pasta resembles tagliatelle, the dough is made with milk, rather than eggs. Famously served with seafood in the region, it is said to have been created in the 1960s by local celebrity Chef Enrico Cosentino.
’Ndunderi pasta
’Ndunderi
’Ndunderi di Minori is considered the longest-lived gnocchi. In fact, it is recognized and protected by UNESCO as among the first forms of pasta made in Italy. This humble dumpling is a modern-day variation of an ancient Roman dish called farina caserta, which literally translates to wheyed flour. Today, it is made with flour and ricotta. ’Ndunderi di Minori is a traditional dish of the Amalfi Coast that is widely eaten during the celebrations of Santa Trofimena, patron saint of the city of Minori, and Gusta Minori held at the end of August to promote the gastronomy of the region.