recipes
American Fare Dishes text with 2.0 in blue circle
On November 18th, American Fare, a celebration of Chef Charlie Palmer’s American cuisine, took place at Charlie Palmer Steak and Sky & Vine Rooftop Bar in Archer Hotel Napa.

Chefs from the Charlie Palmer Collective each chose a recipe from the cookbook Charlie Palmer’s American Fare and added their own twist. The event was designed to uncover the many layers of American cuisine in a fun, competitive, and interactive, taste-around style event.

These are the original cookbook recipes with notes from the chefs who featured updated versions. Pairings are provided by a selection of Charlie Palmer Collective sommeliers according to offerings at each of their restaurants.

a celebration of Chef Charlie Palmer’s American cuisine
Cioppino
Serves 6 to 8

Ingredients
½ cup olive oil
6 large cloves garlic, sliced
2 onions, chopped
1 leek (with some green part), well washed and chopped
1 carrot, peeled and minced
1 red bell pepper, cored, seeded, and diced
Two 28-oz cans San Marzano tomatoes, cut into pieces, with their juice
1 can canned tomato sauce
2 tbs chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley, plus more for garnish if desired
2 tbs chopped fresh basil leaves
1 tsp dried thyme
1 tsp dried oregano
One 8-oz bottle clam juice
½ cup dry white wine
Salt and pepper
Red pepper flakes
1 lb firm-fleshed fish—such as bass, snapper, or halibut—cut into bite-size pieces
1 to 2 Dungeness crab, cracked into pieces
1 dozen clams
1 lb peeled and deveined shrimp
½ lb scallops
Parsley to garnish

Heat the olive oil in a soup pot over medium heat. Add the garlic, onions, leek, carrot, and bell pepper and cook, stirring frequently, for about 5 minutes or until the vegetables begin to soften.

Add the tomatoes, tomato sauce, parsley, basil, thyme, and oregano, stirring to blend. Add the clam juice and wine, season with salt and pepper and red pepper flakes, and bring to a simmer. Cook at a low simmer for 40 minutes or until the flavors have blended nicely. (You can make the base up to this point, cool, and store, covered and refrigerated, for up to 3 days. Reheat before serving.)

About 20 minutes before you’re ready to serve, return the base to a boil. Add the fish and cook for 5 minutes. Then add the crab and clams and return to the simmer. Cook for 5 minutes or just until the clams begin to open slightly. Add the shrimp and scallops and cook for another 5 minutes.

Remove from the heat and ladle into large, shallow soup bowls or one large soup tureen. Garnish with parsley, if desired, and serve with warm bread for sopping up the delicious broth.

Purveyor Spotlight
Francisco Lopez headshot
Chef Francisco Lopez at Charlie Palmer Steak Napa created his spin on this dish, calling it
Cioppino: Halibut, Scallop, Clams, Crab, Shrimp, Saffron Tomato Broth, Pernod Air.
Cioppino reminds me of New England, which is home to me,” explained Chef Lopez. “My spin on this dish was to ‘bite-size’ it with a Pernod foam.”
To try a combination of this version and the original, follow the recipe above and then serve the Cioppino in large oyster shells. It’s the perfect party appetizer, and its presentation is a surefire crowd-pleaser.
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Peter Triolo headshot
Lindsey Geddes headshot
Lilia Suter headshot
Kristina Colon headshot
Peter Triolo, Director Food and Beverage, Charlie Palmer Steak Napa

Chateau Du Moulin-A-Vent, “Couvent Des Thorins” Gamay 2016

This dish requires a wine that complements the stew, one that is juicy and with not too much young fruit. This selection brings that along, with a little tang and spiciness to it as well.

Lindsey Geddes, MS Wine Director, Charlie Palmer Steak Las Vegas

Domaine Jean-Marc Brocard Chablis “Sainte Claire,” Burgundy, France 2017

Chardonnay from Chablis is a light, fresh, mineral-driven white with hints of sea spray that complement the shellfish in the dish. The buttery notes of the Chablis enhance the body of the dish.

Lilia Suter, Sommelier, Charlie Palmer Steak Reno

Dei Vino Nobile di Montepulciano DOCG 2014

On the nose, notes of sour cherry jam, ripe red fruit, dried violets, and cinnamon. On the palate, medium bodied with notes of bright cherry, red/black currant, and plum finishing with fine tannins. This wine pairs well as the brightness, and red-fruit-dominant flavors play off the tomato-saffron broth.

Kristina Colon, Manager, Upper Story Events

Chateau des Mille Anges Blanc, Bordeaux 2017

This wine has citrus and mineral notes that pair well with the cioppino, since it is a seafood-based dish. This light white will not overpower the dish, leaving you with the opportunity to enjoy the notes of saffron and Pernod.

Peter Triolo headshot
Peter Triolo, Director Food and Beverage, Charlie Palmer Steak Napa

Chateau Du Moulin-A-Vent, “Couvent Des Thorins” Gamay 2016

This dish requires a wine that complements the stew, one that is juicy and with not too much young fruit. This selection brings that along, with a little tang and spiciness to it as well.

Lindsey Geddes headshot
Lindsey Geddes, MS Wine Director, Charlie Palmer Steak Las Vegas

Domaine Jean-Marc Brocard Chablis “Sainte Claire,” Burgundy, France 2017

Chardonnay from Chablis is a light, fresh, mineral-driven white with hints of sea spray that complement the shellfish in the dish. The buttery notes of the Chablis enhance the body of the dish.

Lilia Suter headshot
Lilia Suter, Sommelier, Charlie Palmer Steak Reno

Dei Vino Nobile di Montepulciano DOCG 2014

On the nose, notes of sour cherry jam, ripe red fruit, dried violets, and cinnamon. On the palate, medium bodied with notes of bright cherry, red/black currant, and plum finishing with fine tannins. This wine pairs well as the brightness, and red-fruit-dominant flavors play off the tomato-saffron broth.

Kristina Colon headshot
Kristina Colon, Manager, Upper Story Events

Chateau des Mille Anges Blanc, Bordeaux 2017

This wine has citrus and mineral notes that pair well with the cioppino, since it is a seafood-based dish. This light white will not overpower the dish, leaving you with the opportunity to enjoy the notes of saffron and Pernod.

Mussels in Chorizo-Tomato Broth
Mussels in Chorizo-Tomato Broth
Serves 6

Ingredients
5 lbs mussels in the shell
One 28-oz can chopped San Marzano tomatoes with their juice
6 oz Spanish chorizo, cut into small cubes
1 cup dry white wine
3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
1 tsp fresh thyme leaves
Large pinch saffron
Pepper to taste
Crusty bread or garlic bread

Clean the mussels by scrubbing them in a sink full of cold water. Pull off any beards that remain. Discard any mussels that remain open, and place the mussels in a large soup pot.

Combine the tomatoes with the chorizo in a large bowl. Add the wine, garlic, and thyme, stirring to blend well. Add the saffron and pepper, and then pour the tomato mixture over the mussels.

Place the pot over high heat, cover, and bring to a boil, shaking the pan occasionally to move the mussels around. Cook for about 5 minutes or until all of the mussels have opened. Discard any mussels that have not opened, as they might be tainted.

Ladle an equal portion of the mussels, along with the broth, into each of 6 large, shallow soup bowls. Serve immediately with crusty bread or garlic bread to sop up the broth.

Mussels 2.0 at Charlie Palmer Steak Las Vegas
Chef Lalo Saavedra at Charlie Palmer Steak Las Vegas
Chef Lalo Saavedra at Charlie Palmer Steak Las Vegas created his spin on this dish, calling it
Chorizo Fried Mussels.
I love clams and mussels. One of the first dishes I saw Chef Palmer make was steamed mussels, so this dish takes me back to that memory. In my version of the dish, I added a spicy kick and incorporated all of the ingredients—mussels, chorizo, saffron, etc.—into a tomato jam, instead of just the San Marzano tomatoes.”
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Peter Triolo headshot
Lindsey Geddes headshot
Lilia Suter headshot
Kristina Colon headshot
Peter Triolo, Director Food and Beverage, Charlie Palmer Steak Napa

Laura Aschero Vermentino Riveria Ligure di Ponente 2017

Vermentino tends to have a creamy texture, which goes well with the creaminess of the fried mussels. It also has the acidity to cut through the chorizo and complement the sauce. Always makes me think of sitting by the Mediterranean, breathing in that delicious sea air!

Lindsey Geddes, MS Wine Director, Charlie Palmer Steak Las Vegas

Trousseau Blend, Domaine du Pélican, Arbois, Jura, France 2016

Red wines from the Jura are light, zesty, and spicy wines with a backbone of strong minerality. This pairing is sure to marry the chorizo spice and ocean flavors of the dish.

Lilia Suter, Sommelier, Charlie Palmer Steak Reno

CVNE “Viña Real” Reserva, Rioja 2012

On the nose, aromas of rich red fruit, licorice, and balsamic from barrel aging. Round and well-structured with notes of herbal plum, red berries, and leather with a racy finish. This wine pairs well: It won’t overpower the dish, and the brightness of the wine balances the richness of the chorizo.

Kristina Colon, Manager, Upper Story Events

CVNE “Viña Real” Rioja Rosado, Rioja 2014

This is a Rioja rosé made from tempranillo. It has floral aromas and notes of grapefruit and strawberries on the palate. The bright acidity helps cut through the fat from the fried mussels. This medium-bodied rosé is a perfect pairing for the spicy chorizo.

Peter Triolo headshot
Peter Triolo, Director Food and Beverage, Charlie Palmer Steak Napa

Laura Aschero Vermentino Riveria Ligure di Ponente 2017

Vermentino tends to have a creamy texture, which goes well with the creaminess of the fried mussels. It also has the acidity to cut through the chorizo and complement the sauce. Always makes me think of sitting by the Mediterranean, breathing in that delicious sea air!

Lindsey Geddes headshot
Lindsey Geddes, MS Wine Director, Charlie Palmer Steak Las Vegas

Trousseau Blend, Domaine du Pélican, Arbois, Jura, France 2016

Red wines from the Jura are light, zesty, and spicy wines with a backbone of strong minerality. This pairing is sure to marry the chorizo spice and ocean flavors of the dish.

Lilia Suter headshot
Lilia Suter, Sommelier, Charlie Palmer Steak Reno

CVNE “Viña Real” Reserva, Rioja 2012

On the nose, aromas of rich red fruit, licorice, and balsamic from barrel aging. Round and well-structured with notes of herbal plum, red berries, and leather with a racy finish. This wine pairs well: It won’t overpower the dish, and the brightness of the wine balances the richness of the chorizo.

Kristina Colon headshot
Kristina Colon, Manager, Upper Story Events

CVNE “Viña Real” Rioja Rosado, Rioja 2014

This is a Rioja rosé made from tempranillo. It has floral aromas and notes of grapefruit and strawberries on the palate. The bright acidity helps cut through the fat from the fried mussels. This medium-bodied rosé is a perfect pairing for the spicy chorizo.

cooked leg of lamb with seasonings
Leg of Lamb with Herbs and Roasted Garlic
Serves 6

Ingredients
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
Grated zest and juice of 1 lemon
1 tbs chopped fresh rosemary
2 tsp fresh thyme leaves
2 tsp celery seed
7-lb bone-in leg of lamb
10 cloves garlic, peeled and cut in half if large
Salt and pepper to taste
3 shallots, finely chopped
1/2 cup chicken stock or nonfat, low-sodium chicken broth
1/4 cup dry white wine
1 tbs unsalted butter, room temperature
1 tbs chopped fresh chives

Preheat the oven to 450°F.

Combine the oil with the lemon zest and juice, rosemary, thyme, and celery seed in a small bowl. Set aside.

Using a small, sharp knife, make small random slits in the flesh of the lamb. Fill each slit with a piece of garlic. Using your hands, generously coat the outside of the lamb with the oil mixture, patting it into the meat. Season generously with salt and pepper.

Place the seasoned meat on a rack placed in a flameproof roasting pan. Roast for 40 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 375°F and continue to roast for another hour or until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part reads 135°F for medium-rare (roast for about another 15 minutes to 150°F for medium).

Transfer the lamb to a serving platter, lightly tent with aluminum foil, and allow to rest for 10 minutes before carving. Note that the lamb will continue to cook while it rests, with the temperature rising about 10 degrees.

Transfer the roasting pan to the stovetop over medium heat. Add the shallots and cook, stirring up the browned bits from the bottom of the roaster, for about 3 minutes. Stir in the chicken stock and wine, and bring to a boil. Boil, stirring frequently, for about 5 minutes or until the liquid has become sauce-like. Stir in the butter and taste. If necessary, season with salt and pepper. Remove from the heat and stir in the chives.

Using a carving knife, cut the lamb into thin slices and serve with a bit of the sauce drizzled over the top. Pass the remaining sauce as you serve.

Plated Polenta Braised Lamb Shoulder
Michael Ferraro headshot
For the American Fare event, Well Plated Executive Chef and Director of Culinary Concepts Michael Ferraro created a Polenta Braised Lamb Shoulder.
My polenta braised lamb shoulder is a play on Chef Palmer’s lamb shank. Braising the shoulder in polenta was a way to incorporate my Italian spin on the dish.”
Ferraro uses high-quality, coarse polenta for this dish. He literally pours it over the lamb shank, seals the dish, and lets it cook together in a pan. The polenta is eventually strained in a China cap before using.
Perfect Pairings text with arrow pointing down
Peter Triolo headshot
Lindsey Geddes headshot
Lilia Suter headshot
Kristina Colon headshot
Peter Triolo, Director Food and Beverage, Charlie Palmer Steak Napa

Mayacamas Merlot Mt Veeder 2014

Mountain merlot fruit that does not see any oak and produces great, full-bodied fruit to cut the fattiness of the lamb shoulder. The star anise, clove, and cardamom complement the braising sauce.

Lindsey Geddes, MS Wine Director, Charlie Palmer Steak Las Vegas

Nebbiolo, Cascina Fontana, Barolo, Piedmont, Italy 2014

Barolo is the king of wines. Full-bodied with lots of tannin and acid packed, full of complex flavors that enhance the simplicity of the dish. Barolo is dominated by red fruits of cranberry, raspberry, and maraschino cherries, combined with the structure of the wine that cuts through the fat of the lamb.

Lilia Suter, Sommelier, Charlie Palmer Steak Reno

Domaine du Vieux Telegraphe “La Crau” Châteauneuf-du-Pape 2015

On the nose are delicate florals scents as well as mix of savory, tobacco, cherry, and blood orange. On the palate, full-bodied and silky with a long mineral-driven finish. This wine is a classic pairing with the rich red fruit and rustic savory components.

Kristina Colon, Manager, Upper Story Events

Benito Ferrera Irpinia Aglianico Quattro Confini, Campagnia, 2016

Aglianico is an often forgotten grape varietal with aromas of black currant, cherry, plum, and chocolate. It is very tannic with a bright acidity. Lamb and polenta are a perfect pairing for the Italian grape variety. The gamey lamb needs a wine with tannins to match the flavor profile.

Peter Triolo headshot
Peter Triolo, Director Food and Beverage, Charlie Palmer Steak Napa

Mayacamas Merlot Mt Veeder 2014

Mountain merlot fruit that does not see any oak and produces great, full-bodied fruit to cut the fattiness of the lamb shoulder. The star anise, clove, and cardamom complement the braising sauce.

Lindsey Geddes headshot
Lindsey Geddes, MS Wine Director, Charlie Palmer Steak Las Vegas

Nebbiolo, Cascina Fontana, Barolo, Piedmont, Italy 2014

Barolo is the king of wines. Full-bodied with lots of tannin and acid packed, full of complex flavors that enhance the simplicity of the dish. Barolo is dominated by red fruits of cranberry, raspberry, and maraschino cherries, combined with the structure of the wine that cuts through the fat of the lamb.

Lilia Suter headshot
Lilia Suter, Sommelier, Charlie Palmer Steak Reno

Domaine du Vieux Telegraphe “La Crau” Châteauneuf-du-Pape 2015

On the nose are delicate florals scents as well as mix of savory, tobacco, cherry, and blood orange. On the palate, full-bodied and silky with a long mineral-driven finish. This wine is a classic pairing with the rich red fruit and rustic savory components.

Kristina Colon headshot
Kristina Colon, Manager, Upper Story Events

Benito Ferrera Irpinia Aglianico Quattro Confini, Campagnia, 2016

Aglianico is an often forgotten grape varietal with aromas of black currant, cherry, plum, and chocolate. It is very tannic with a bright acidity. Lamb and polenta are a perfect pairing for the Italian grape variety. The gamey lamb needs a wine with tannins to match the flavor profile.

Plated Long Island Duck Breast with Citrus Couscous
Long Island Duck Breast with Citrus Couscous
Serves 6

Ingredients
6 boneless Long Island duck breast halves, 6 to 8 oz each
1 tbs canola oil
Grated zest of 1 lemon
1/2 tsp ground juniper berries
1/4 tsp pepper, plus more as needed
3 tbs Chartreuse (see note)
Salt to taste
Grated zest and juice of 1 small orange
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
3/4 cup heavy cream
1 tbs chopped fresh chives
Citrus Couscous (recipe to follow)

Remove the skin from each duck breast half and reserve.

Place the skinless breasts in a resealable plastic bag. Add the oil along with the lemon zest, juniper berries, and pepper. Add 1 tablespoon of the Chartreuse. Seal the bag, and vigorously massage to evenly coat the breasts with the seasoning. Set aside for 30 minutes.

Place the duck skins in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Fry, stirring occasionally, for about 15 minutes or until all of the fat has rendered out and the skin is very crisp. Transfer the skin to a double layer of paper towels to drain. Once drained, break into small pieces and set aside.

Pour off all but about 1 tablespoon of the duck fat and return the pan to medium-high heat. Remove the breasts from the marinade, season with salt, and place in the hot pan. Sear, turning once, for about 6 minutes or until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part reads 125°F for very rare or 135°F for medium-rare. (Most chefs now serve duck breast very rare, taking it out of the pan at about 122°F, with the rest time bringing it up to rare temperature.) Place the breasts on a warm plate and tent lightly with aluminum foil to keep warm for 5 minutes while you finish the sauce.

Lower the heat under the pan and add the remaining 2 tablespoons of Chartreuse, stirring for about a minute or so to deglaze the pan. Add the orange juice and butter, stirring to blend well. Add the cream, raise the heat slightly, and bring to a simmer. Season with salt and pepper and simmer for about 5 minutes or until reduced and slightly thickened. Remove from the heat and stir in the orange zest and chives.

Place a mound of couscous to the sides of 6 warm dinner plates.

Working with one piece at a time and using a sharp knife, cut the breasts crosswise on the bias, keeping the breast intact as you cut. When ready to plate, put your knife under the sliced breast and, using your other hand to hold the top together, transfer to the center of the couscous on each plate. Once plated, pull the knife back towards you so that the breast stays in place but the slices open slightly.

Drizzle the pan sauce over each breast and the couscous and around the edge of the plate. Garnish with a few pieces of the crisp duck breast skin sprinkled over all.

Citrus Couscous
2 tbs unsalted butter
1 shallot, finely chopped
2 1/2 cups chicken stock or nonfat, low-sodium chicken broth
1/4 cup orange juice
2 tbs lemon juice
Salt and pepper to taste
2 cups couscous
Grated zest of 1 lemon

Melt the butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the shallot and cook, stirring frequently, for about 2 minutes or just until softened.

Add the stock along with the orange and lemon juices. Season with salt and pepper, and bring to a boil. Immediately add the couscous and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to its lowest possible setting, cover, and cook for about 5 minutes or until all of the liquid has been absorbed. Let rest, covered, for 5 minutes.

Uncover and add the lemon zest, using a fork to fluff the grains and incorporate the zest. Serve as directed in the recipe.

Plated Winter-Spice-Rubbed Long Island Duck Breast with Huckleberry Gastrique
Chef Fernando Marulanda headshot
Chef Fernando Marulanda at Upper Story Events and Crimson & Rye calls his duck dish version Winter-Spice-Rubbed Long Island Duck Breast with Huckleberry Gastrique.
I love the versatility of duck. It is a majestic and delicious bird, and the perfect winter comfort food. It is a game bird, but its meat is almost like biting into a good steak. I put my own spin on this dish by adding a winter spice rub that includes ginger, paprika, cumin, turmeric, cayenne, and cinnamon, as well as a gastrique of my favorite berry: huckleberry.”
Marulanda serves this dish with a salad of shaved fennel, julienned Granny Smith apples, and blanched circus frisée, topped with whole huckleberries.
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Peter Triolo headshot
Lindsey Geddes headshot
Lilia Suter headshot
Kristina Colon headshot
Peter Triolo, Director Food and Beverage, Charlie Palmer Steak Napa

A. Rafenelli Zinfandel Dry Creek Valley 2016

Winter and duck both make me think of zinfandel, and this one has those hints of spices and great vine-ripened fruit to match well with the duck.

Lindsey Geddes, MS Wine Director, Charlie Palmer Steak Las Vegas

Syrah, Big Basin Vineyards, Coastview Vineyard, Monterey County, California 2013

Syrah by nature is a spicy, medium-bodied varietal. Syrah wines from Monterey have a delicate Asian five spice character to them that enhances the spice rub on the duck and adds flavor to the huckleberry gastrique.

Lilia Suter, Sommelier, Charlie Palmer Steak Reno

Merry Edwards Russian River Valley Pinot Noir 2015

On the nose, notes of ripe red fruit, blue plums, and scents of lilac and rose along with cola, chocolate, and savory mushrooms. On the palate, the ripe fruit is complemented by chocolate-hazelnut spread, fig compote, and lingonberries.

Kristina Colon, Manager, Upper Story Events

Clos du Val Pinot Noir Carneros 2016

This wine has a rich, velvety mouthfeel with notes of cherry and red fruits. It leaves you with notes of chocolate and raspberry on the nose. Pinot noir and duck is a classic pairing, but Clos du Val’s cherry notes also pair well with the huckleberry gastrique.

Peter Triolo headshot
Peter Triolo, Director Food and Beverage, Charlie Palmer Steak Napa

A. Rafenelli Zinfandel Dry Creek Valley 2016

Winter and duck both make me think of zinfandel, and this one has those hints of spices and great vine-ripened fruit to match well with the duck.

Lindsey Geddes headshot
Lindsey Geddes, MS Wine Director, Charlie Palmer Steak Las Vegas

Syrah, Big Basin Vineyards, Coastview Vineyard, Monterey County, California 2013

Syrah by nature is a spicy, medium-bodied varietal. Syrah wines from Monterey have a delicate Asian five spice character to them that enhances the spice rub on the duck and adds flavor to the huckleberry gastrique.

Lilia Suter headshot
Lilia Suter, Sommelier, Charlie Palmer Steak Reno

Merry Edwards Russian River Valley Pinot Noir 2015

On the nose, notes of ripe red fruit, blue plums, and scents of lilac and rose along with cola, chocolate, and savory mushrooms. On the palate, the ripe fruit is complemented by chocolate-hazelnut spread, fig compote, and lingonberries.

Kristina Colon headshot
Kristina Colon, Manager, Upper Story Events

Clos du Val Pinot Noir Carneros 2016

This wine has a rich, velvety mouthfeel with notes of cherry and red fruits. It leaves you with notes of chocolate and raspberry on the nose. Pinot noir and duck is a classic pairing, but Clos du Val’s cherry notes also pair well with the huckleberry gastrique.

Cooked Turkey Marsala
Turkey Marsala
Serves 6

Ingredients
3 tbs olive oil
2 cups sliced mushrooms, either button or cremini
Salt and pepper to taste
1/2 cups chicken stock or nonfat, low-sodium chicken broth
1 cup Wondra Flour
6 to 8 turkey cutlets
3/4 cup Marsala wine
3 tbs unsalted butter
1 tbs chopped flat-leaf parsley

Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add the mushrooms, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Cook, stirring frequently, for about 5 minutes or until the mushrooms have exuded their liquid and are beginning to brown.

Lift the pan and carefully drain off excess oil. Return the pan to medium heat and add the chicken stock. Bring to a simmer, lower the heat, and cook at a bare simmer for 3 minutes. Remove from the heat and keep warm.

Combine the flour with salt and pepper in a large shallow bowl. Working with one piece at a time, press both sides of the turkey into the seasoned flour, shaking off excess.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. When very hot, but not smoking, add the floured turkey. Fry, turning once, for about 10 minutes or until the turkey is golden brown on both sides and just cooked through. Transfer to a warm platter, tent lightly with aluminum foil, and keep warm.

Drain the oil from the pan and return the pan to medium-high heat. When very hot, add the Marsala and carefully ignite by tipping the pan to the side so that the flame can touch the wine. It should ignite quickly. Lift the pan from the fire and let the flame die out. If you do not have a gas stove, you can use a long match such as those used for fireplaces to ignite the wine.

Return the pan to medium heat and add the reserved mushrooms, stirring to blend. Then stir in the butter, and season with salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer, stirring to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan.

Pour the sauce over the turkey, sprinkle with parsley, and serve.

Plated Joyce Farms Turkey Marsala over Lemon-Scented Barley Risotto
Chef Michael Mahoney headshot
For the American Fare event, Chef Michael Mahoney at Charlie Palmer Steak Reno created a Joyce Farms Turkey Marsala over Lemon-Scented Barley Risotto.
While I have made Chef Palmer’s barley risotto here before and really liked it, I had never made it in this style, and it surprised me. I am pairing this with the turkey marsala because they complement each other very well. My little spin is on the risotto itself: I added some semidried tomatoes and lemon zest. The tomatoes give the risotto a little extra earthiness and sweetness, while the lemon zest brightens it up. I really like those two elements, earthy and brightness, contrasting each other.”
Mahoney recommends cooking the turkey the day before, if possible, and making a turkey stock to use in the barley recipe.
Perfect Pairings text with arrow pointing down
Peter Triolo headshot
Lindsey Geddes headshot
Lilia Suter headshot
Kristina Colon headshot
Peter Triolo, Director Food and Beverage, Charlie Palmer Steak Napa

Freemark Abbey Viognier Napa Valley 2018

Viognier always comes to mind for chicken marsala, as it has the body, sweetness, and acidity to balance the sauce. The citrus notes in the wine balances well with barley risotto.

Lindsey Geddes, MS Wine Director, Charlie Palmer Steak Las Vegas

Pinot Noir, Hirsch, San Andreas, Sonoma County 2017

Pinot noir is the classic pairing with turkey. Hirsch pinot noirs have an ethereal crunch to them that can lift the marsala flavors out of the dish and have your palate swimming in festive flavors.

Lilia Suter, Sommelier, Charlie Palmer Steak Reno

Domaine Serene “Yamhill Cuvee” Willamette Valley, OR 2016

On the nose, rich aromas of Bing cherry, blackberry, and sarsaparilla. On the palate, the aromas carry through with cherry and blackberry and are integrated with fine tannins and spicy notes. This 100 percent pinot noir allows the Marsala-dominating flavors to shine and complements the earthiness of the barley risotto.

Kristina Colon, Manager, Upper Story Events

Chappellet Chenin Blanc Signature 2018

This wine has a crisp acidity and creamy texture with notes of green apple, peach, and lemon zest. The fresh fruit notes and lemon pair well with lemon-scented barley risotto without overpowering it. The crisp acidity helps cut through the butter in the sauce, so that you can taste the sauce’s complexity and depth.

Peter Triolo headshot
Peter Triolo, Director Food and Beverage, Charlie Palmer Steak Napa

Freemark Abbey Viognier Napa Valley 2018

Viognier always comes to mind for chicken marsala, as it has the body, sweetness, and acidity to balance the sauce. The citrus notes in the wine balances well with barley risotto.

Lindsey Geddes headshot
Lindsey Geddes, MS Wine Director, Charlie Palmer Steak Las Vegas

Pinot Noir, Hirsch, San Andreas, Sonoma County 2017

Pinot noir is the classic pairing with turkey. Hirsch pinot noirs have an ethereal crunch to them that can lift the marsala flavors out of the dish and have your palate swimming in festive flavors.

Lilia Suter headshot
Lilia Suter, Sommelier, Charlie Palmer Steak Reno

Domaine Serene “Yamhill Cuvee” Willamette Valley, OR 2016

On the nose, rich aromas of Bing cherry, blackberry, and sarsaparilla. On the palate, the aromas carry through with cherry and blackberry and are integrated with fine tannins and spicy notes. This 100 percent pinot noir allows the Marsala-dominating flavors to shine and complements the earthiness of the barley risotto.

Kristina Colon headshot
Kristina Colon, Manager, Upper Story Events

Chappellet Chenin Blanc Signature 2018

This wine has a crisp acidity and creamy texture with notes of green apple, peach, and lemon zest. The fresh fruit notes and lemon pair well with lemon-scented barley risotto without overpowering it. The crisp acidity helps cut through the butter in the sauce, so that you can taste the sauce’s complexity and depth.